Maine Governor Janet Mills: Secret informants, abuse of power, and the end of Maine

Part I.

I remember Janet Mills.  During my bitter split up and child custody dispute I was subjected to false allegations, trumped up charges, and egregious prosecutorial and police misconduct.

Janet Mills, acting as Attorney General, reviewed the case after the trial Court overturned a false conviction due to prosecutor’s misconduct.  The prosecutor, Mary Kellett, by law had to obtain approval from Janet Mills to file an appeal.  If successful, the state’s appeal would have created a new legal precedent in Maine limiting the accused from defending themselves while allowing prosecutors to commit misconduct.  Most legal professionals who reviewed the record were shocked by the trumped up case and the misconduct, but not Janet Mills.  After reviewing the record she approved the prosecutorial misconduct and state’s appeal to the Maine Supreme Judicial Court.

Mills also assigned her staff prosecutors to help Mary Kellett craft the appeal for one of the most egregious examples of prosecutorial malfeasance in Maine’s history.  My life was turned in to a living nightmare.  I endured 12 years of legal battles, threats, criminal prosecutions, and false imprisonment before being fully vindicated.

My legal complaints resulted in the first prosecutor in Maine to be disciplined by the Board of Overseers of the Bar, and for the first Federal civil rights lawsuit against Maine prosecutors to be settled for charges of prosecutorial misconduct.  

Former Chief Justice of the Federal District Court issued an apology and called my experience in Maine’s legal system a “living embodiment of what Franz Kafka wrote about” in his novel The Trial.  Whether reluctantly or not, that Kafkaesque nightmare was approved and supported by Janet Mills.  

Despite numerous court findings and numerous under oath admissions by state perpetrators, not a single law enforcement officer or prosecutor has been held accountable.  None of the police officers were even placed on the Giglio List so their past misconduct could be disclosed in future cases they are involved in.

Janet Mills, as Attorney General and Governor, has not used her authority to hold abusive police and prosecutors to legal or professional standards. 

Part II.

Long before Governor Janet Mills’ Chinese-style lockdowns and persecution of mom-and-pop businesses, she openly advocated for Maine to be turned into East Germany styled police state.  Since 2007, Mills proposed the creation of a network of secret police informants throughout Maine communities.  Even hairdressers would be mandated to proactively engage in small talk with female customers in order to interrogate them about their husbands and their family lives. That information would be secretly reported to police handlers.  It reminded me of the Soviet Union, where neighbors would spy on each other for the state, and where everyone was forced to live in fear and suspicion of each other.  This is the Orwellian vision Janet Mills has articulated for Maine communities in the name of combating domestic violence.

Janet Mills, as a prominent feminist activist, spent much of her life defining and prosecuting the meaning of “consent”.  Yet Mills has used her power to force even medically trained doctors to submit to injections of experimental Covide-19 shots against their will.  “No” does not mean “no” to Janet Mills when she orders Mainers to submit.  If Janet Mills can decree even medical doctors to be injected with experimental drugs against their own medical objections, then what can’t she compel people of Maine to submit to?

But Mills does believe in civil rights, however not the kind most people would recognize. She charged a Christian protester with civil rights violations because he was preaching the bible outside an abortion clinic, which she claimed violated the ‘civil rights’ of people inside Planned Parenthood.  Publicly practicing Christianity is now a civil rights violation in Janet Mills’ Maine because it is deemed an interference to consultations encouraging Maine women to terminate their pregnancies.

And while Maine families are disappearing, Maine’s youth are suffering and dying from the opioid epidemic.  The number one cause of death of Maine men in their prime is suicide and drug overdose, yet for years Janet Mills not only ignored, but has shamed, blamed, and demonized Maine men and boys.

And as Mainers suffer with drugs, poverty, housing, and inflation, Janet Mills has focused on resettling countless thousands of illegal African migrants in to Maine communities.  Local homeless and disabled veterans and poor families struggle to find shelters and affordable housing, while thousands of illegal aliens are settled in to Maine shelters and hotels with all their expenses paid for by struggling taxpayers.

Janet Mills sued the Trump administration on behalf of millions of illegal aliens at a time when Maine has “no-go zones” where native Mainers are assaulted simply for walking in their own neighborhoods and public parks because African gangs have claimed some areas as their territory.  Maine children are labeled as ‘racist’ if they complain about the violence and the 3rd world gangs that have been placed into their schools and communities.

The mass resettlement of illegal aliens from the 3rd world brings more crime, more rapes,  more drugs, more sex trafficking, and more domestic violence.  It is native Mainers who are blamed for the crime statistics which are used by the State to justify more Orwellian laws and abuses against Maine families.

Janet Mills’ priorities have been abortions, divisive race and gender politics, and mass resettlement of criminal aliens into Maine.  This deliberate transformation of once peaceful Maine communities, of Maine traditions, and of Maine’s social cohesion into a 3rd world hell hole, with a banana republic justice system, will be Janet Mills’ true legacy.  

Lying Prosecutors and the Charade of Disciplinary Actions



This week a disciplinary panel in Missouri recommended St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner be found guilty of egregious misconduct in her prosecution of republican Governor Eric Greitens.

The panel concluded that Gardner and an FBI agent both lied about evidence in a criminal case they pursued against Greitens.  The FBI agent, William Don Tisaby, pled guilty in March to tampering with evidence.

Governor Greitens was previously described by the New York Times as a “Rising GOP Star”, but was criminally charged by Kim Gardner for taking an alleged sexual photo of his ex-lover without her permission and for claims of campaign finance violations.

Greitens maintained his innocence and called it “legal harassment.”  After being forced to resign, the criminal case against him fell apart and a complaint was made against Kim Gardner for prosecutorial misconduct.

After an investigation and a hearing the Missouri disciplinary panel determined that Gardner willfully and deliberately lied and allowed an FBI agent to lie about evidence against Greitens.

Providing the proper evidence to defendants is “one of the most basic responsibilities of a prosecutor,” the panel said.   And yet despite recommending the State Supreme Court find her guilty, the panel recommended she not be punished.

If willfully and deliberately lying about evidence in a criminal case against an elected sitting Governor, who was then forced to resign, is not enough to warrant punishment, then what possible recourse does any average Missourian have by filing a disciplinary complaint against any corrupt prosecutor?

This is not the first time Kim Gardner has been mired in controversy after winning her first term as St. Louis’ Circuit Attorney (aka District Attorney) with funding from George Soros.

Gardner previously prosecuted a white couple for guarding their house while holding firearms after armed Black Lives Matter rioters broke on to their private property and threatened to rape and murder them. None of the criminal rioters were charged.

And like other radical, George Soros financed, pro-Black Lives Matter prosecutors, Kim Gardner’s woke racial equity reforms apparently involve not prosecuting black defendants for violent crimes, such as murder.  Gardner and her staff have been known not to show up to hearings, hence forcing the court to dismiss murder cases.  Last year in a span of one week the Court was forced by Gardner’s tactics to dismiss three separate murder cases.  In one of the cases the judge finally made it clear who was responsible, stating:

“In a case like this where the Circuit Attorney’s office has essentially abandoned its duty to prosecute those it charges with crimes, the court must impartially enforce the law and any resultant threat to public is the responsibility of the Circuit Attorney’s Office.”

While letting violent criminals walk, Gardner used her office to go after the police. Prosecuting offices are not tasked with doing criminal investigations, but Gardner’s office overstepped its role by conducting its own criminal investigations and prosecutions of police officers.

In 2019, the Missouri Police Union blasted Gardner’s office for “unprecedented abuse of power” in charging two police officers instead of the suspect they sought charges against for shooting at them.  In a statement, St. Louis Police Officers Association’s Jeff Roorda said:

“Kim Gardner has disregarded the statements of four police officers, video evidence and forensic evidence and instead decided to take the word of a would-be cop-killer who the police department describes as a known gang member and charged the victims in this crime [instead].”

The Police Union also called for a criminal investigation into Gardner’s finances.  The Missouri Ethics Commission fined Gardner $63,009 for concealing financial contributions and using her campaign funds for personal expenses.

In 2020 Gardner filed a federal civil rights lawsuit accusing the city, the local police union and others of entrenched racism and a racist conspiracy to block her reform agenda and force her out of office.

Like countless other criminal prosecutors across the country, Kim Gardner uses her office to engage in prosecutorial misconduct and civil rights abuse with impunity.

Thanks to the Office of Chief Disciplinary Counsel who failed the people of Missouri, Kim Gardner is free to use her law license and prosecutorial power to abuse the innocent, protect the guilty, and undermine the entire justice system in St. Louis.

Law enforcement and the judicial system fail the American people with their useless investigations and corrupt disciplinary board charades which routinely give lawless prosecutors a pass for their crimes.

Gardner is currently running for re-election, as one of 24 radical prosecutors elected in to office with the help of George Soros’s $29 million investment to reshape America using the unchecked power of the prosecutors.

© Vladek Filler

Mike Perdue, Hero Dad

Mike Perdue of Michigan, died using his body to cushion and shield his 11 year old daughter Lanley during a plane crash. The hero dad grabbed and held her body tight in a bear hug to protect her during impact.

The young girl was the sole survivor of the plane crash that left 4 others dead. She credits her father’s tight embrace for saving her life.

His wife, Christie Perdue, told ABC that, “Laney told me in the hospital that her last memory is that dad just grabbed her and held her really, really tight, and in my heart I know that protected her.”

Speaking to CNN, she stated that they originally planned to allow their daughter to fly alone that day to visit her friends on the island, but then her father decided that he should accompany her after all.

“He loves so deeply, and he showed people that love,” she said of her husband. “He was just an amazing human being and we’ll spend the rest of our life just honoring his memory.”

“I Was Disrespected Today”

It is hard to disagree with Feminism’s demand for men to treat women with absolute equality. That should mean, to expect women to pull their own weight and face the same consequences for their actions (as men).

According to Feminism, the kind and selfless actions by the men in the video below constituted ‘misogyny’, which might explain the woman’s disdain towards these men for helping her.

Many young men marry and have children with women like this because they are never taught to have self-respect, or taught to say “no” to women.

A Space Odyssey: A scorned lover, a diaper, and a drill

Houston, We Have A Problem

In June 2018, a crew of six was on board the International Space Station (ISS) for a 7 month mission.  Like all space missions, it was a culmination of years of preparations, tests, simulations, and investment of hundreds of billions of dollars and dedication of thousands of people.

Less than 3 months in to the space mission, on August 30, 2018, the ISS suddenly began to lose air pressure causing the crew to scramble. Ground control calculated that there would be a complete loss of air on ISS within 18 days.  Finding the source of the air leak was akin to finding a needle in a hay stack, and if not managed quickly, it would force an emergency evacuation of the crew.

The Russian crew found the leak and against the recommendation of the American crew, undertook a risky but effective way to seal it.  The leak came from holes drilled in to the hull of the Russian habitation module’s toilet area, and was concealed by a cloth cover.

An official cited by Russian press stated that the person responsible for the holes clearly lacked knowledge of the Soyuz capsule’s structure and made eight attempts to drill holes, some in strange locations, with “a wavering hand” operating the drill, before finally getting one hole all the way through. They cite evidence that the holes were deliberately drilled from inside the craft and while it was in the weightless environment.

After an extensive investigation by the Roscosmos state space agency, the matter has been referred for criminal charges.  Their official statement reads:

“All results of the investigation regarding the hole in the habitation compartment of the Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft have been handed over to law enforcement agencies.”

Officially few details have been released about the report; however, details of the investigation have been emerging through Russian news media.

The findings and allegations are shocking.

Russian news agencies RIA Novosti and TASS reported that NASA’s female astronaut Serena Maria Auñón-Chancellor drilled the holes “due to suffering [a psychological episode] after a failed romantic relationship with one of the crew members.”

TASS and Izvestia, citing a high ranking official source, reported that Auñón-Chancellor took drastic action to ‘speed up her return to Earth’.

Reports allege that the American crew commander, Andrew Fustel, submitted an emergency request to NASA to have Auñón-Chancellor evacuated from ISS due to a medical condition.  NASA allegedly refused the request.  A return from ISS requires three crew members.  In order to bring Auñón-Chancellor back to earth early NASA would have to pay up to $85 million dollars to have Russia launch another Soyuz rocket and crew to pick her up.  NASA was not inclined to do so. 

The only other way Aunon-Chancellor could be flown back to earth early was if there was an emergency on the space station requiring all crew members to be evacuated. 

Unconfirmed reports claim that during this time, the toilet on the American side of ISS broke down, forcing the American crew to employ diapers.  Auñón-Chancellor allegedly took issue with this, complained, and requested special accommodations to use the Russian crew’s habitation module toilet.  Her request was allegedly denied. 

NASA has not confirmed nor denied the broken toilet incident that may have set the subsequent events in motion.

According to Russian sources, while the Russian crew was performing scheduled maintenance on ISS,  Auñón-Chancellor went to their bathroom and drilled the holes in retaliation and as a means to force an emergency return back to earth without  NASA having to pay the Russians $85 million dollars.

There was a reasonable chance the drilled hole would not be located by the crew in time.  The Russians would have to use the same habitation module to return the crew back to earth. The drilled holes in the module would have never been discovered on earth because the module would be discarded and burned up in earth’s atmosphere during reentry.

Aside from the claims of Auñón-Chancellor’s psychotic behavior, her alleged actions suggest that it was not entirely an insane plan by a crazy person, but rather a well calculated and deliberate crime.

The Russian media has cited claims of NASA’s stonewalling of Roscosmos’ investigation.  A video recording on board the space station which monitors the common area between American and Russian capsules was “mysteriously” not made available. NASA also refused to allow Russians to examine the drills on board ISS to test them for metal shavings.  Upon return to earth, both Russian crew members submitted to polygraph tests while NASA refused to conduct or allow a polygraph test on Serena Marie Auñón-Chancellor.  NASA also refused to provide her psychological and medical evaluation results.

The allegations and NASA’s response raises legitimate questions.  This is not the first time female NASA astronauts have been accused of serious misconduct.

In 2019, NASA astronaut Anne McClain was accused of committing crimes from space against her ex-wife during their bitter divorce and child custody battle.  The drama involved McClain’s attempt to gain custody of her ex-wife’s biological son who was born to the woman prior to her meeting McClain.  The personal and legal drama raised accusations while McClain was on NASA’s mission on ISS.  McClain was accused of using ISS computers in space to stalk and snoop on her ex-wife’s bank accounts and transactions.  McClain denied any wrongdoing and was not charged with any crimes, nor reprimanded by NASA.

In 2007, NASA astronaut Lisa Nowak packed a drilling hammer, an 8-inch buck knife, a disc of female bondage instructions, a map of her target’s neighborhood, gloves, a wig, BB gun, pepper spray, four feet of rubber tubing, duct tape, and other items in to her husband’s car.  She then allegedly used two diapers in order to avoid bathroom breaks as she drove non-stop for 900 miles from Texas to Florida in order to execute an attack on her astronaut ex-lover’s new girlfriend.  The assault took place at the Orlando airport, after Nowak allegedly stalked her victim for two months. Novak was arrested and pleaded guilty to several felonies.

After that widely publicized Novak incident, NASA instituted psychological testing.  

But in 2018, regarding questions of Aunon-Chancellor’s condition on ISS and the hole drilling incident, NASA’s official pubic statement was: “To protect their privacy, the agency will not discuss medical information regarding crew members.”’ 

One Russian blogger writing about Auñón-Chancellor allegations wrote that Russians rarely send women in to space because women tend to fail psychological stress tests required for such jobs.

Some may immediately label such statements, and even such tests, as anti-woman, however, that comment raises the question of whether NASA is hiring people based on merits and their abilities to do the required jobs, rather than based on positive discrimination.

The question organizations such as NASA, US Department of Defense,  and all law enforcement agencies have to address is whether they are hiring the best possible people for the job.

The evidence seems to be, that they are not.  NASA is more interested in publicizing a “Historic All Women Spacewalk”, while its astronauts depend on Russians and their all male crews to fly them to and from ISS on Russian built rockets.

America must overcome identity politics and employ only the best people for the job based on merits rather than on political diversity quotas of sex, race, or gender.

If America fails to change its course and hire the absolute best men and women for the job, then psychologically unstable astronauts drilling holes in a $150 billion space station will be the least of our problems.

© Vladek Filler

Maine prosecutor, police, and town official charged in $13 million federal drug case

A Maine prosecutor, sheriff’s deputies, police officer and town selectman were among a dozen individuals charged in federal court on Wednesday in connection with a $13 million dollar illegal drug operation.

According to federal charges, Franklin county prosecutor Kayla Alves tipped off the police officers involved in the conspiracy about the surveillance and the federal criminal investigation in to the drug enterprise.  She is also charged with tempering with evidence.

It is not clear how district attorney Andrew Robinson overlooked all the criminality around him, while his assistant DA Kayla Alves was fully aware of the federal investigation and surveillance where local police officers, sheriff’s deputies, and a local politician were either employed by, or were partners of, the criminal enterprise that was under federal investigation for drug trafficking. It is possible Kayla Alves was not properly trained or supervised. Her highly reputable attorney, Walter McKee, stated she did nothing illegal.

Nevertheless, there are a lot of serious federal charges and in order to gain a better understanding, a closer examination of Andrew Robinson’s DA office and its priorities is warranted.

As prosecutor, Kayla Alves handled domestic violence cases in Robinson’s DA office.  Robinson started his own prosecutorial career handling domestic violence cases and made women’s issues one of the main priorities of his administration. Holding a radical feminist world view has been a long standing political litmus test for Maine prosecutors. It is virtually impossible to become a district attorney in Maine without bowing to radical feminists who run the domestic violence racket using millions of dollars of federal funds.

In May of this year, for example, Robinson wrote a strong letter to Maine Legislature’s Judiciary Committee in support of a new Bill that would allow gender discrimination in prostitution cases.  The law would allow prostitutes criminal immunity and expungement of past convictions.  This would likely result in even more prostitution.  However, under the proposed law men would face “increased penalties” and harsher prosecution for engaging prostitutes.   Robinson’s sexist position views female criminals as victims who need to be protected from criminal records, and criminal prosecution applied based on gender rather than on facts and evidence in each case.

In a truly Orwellian fashion Robinson called this an “Equality Model”.

Some Maine prosecutors see the world through ‘The Power and Control Wheel’ which was fabricated out of thin air by a couple of unqualified radical feminists to justify blaming men accused by any woman.  Perhaps Robinson has been more focused on how to spend the federal Violence Against Women Act grants or to find more men to prosecute rather than noticing the $13 million dollar drug empire operating in his district with the help of his staff and local law enforcement.  Clearly local corruption was not Robinson’s priority.

Perhaps the federal prosecutors should use DA Robinson’s “Equality Model” to hold him responsible as a man and supervisor of Kayla Alves. Using the same logic Maine prosecutors employ against men, the ‘power dynamic’ in his DA office should be taken in to consideration.  And perhaps federal prosecutors should consider Kayla Alves’ feelings for any possible criminal charging decisions against DA Robinson. After all, in Maine criminal charging decisions are often based on ‘believing all women’ and their feelings about their inner thoughts rather than their actions.

Perhaps what’s good for the goose is good for the gander.

And while many Maine men get little to no sympathy from the State as they struggle with economic hardship and substance abuse, what they do get is criminal prosecutions, imprisonment, and their lives permanently destroyed.  The suicide rate of Maine men is off the charts.  For many years suicide was the number one cause of death of Maine men in their prime. Today it’s ranked number two just below drug overdose deaths.

Is it possible that some Mainers may have been victimized twice by some of these same law enforcement officials; once when they were sold the illicit drugs and a second time when they were prosecuted for buying them? There needs to be more investigations and criminal accountability. 

This case is likely just the tip of the iceberg in Maine, where far greater civil rights crimes are committed by officials, with impunity, throughout the Maine justice system. Maine’s Attorney General is responsible with oversight and prosecution of civil rights crimes. Yet his office has not held any prosecutors or police accountable for misconduct even after court findings of egregious violations.

Perhaps federal authorities and the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division could investigate the rampant corruption that plagues the Maine justice system. And perhaps, DA Robinson and the Maine Judiciary Committee could recall that the real “Equality Model” is detailed in the U.S. Constitution where laws must be applied and enforced equally regardless of anyone’s gender, race, or their social or political status.

© Vladek Filler

Police and Prosecutorial Immunity: A Relic of the Feudal Class System

Last week New York City Council voted to end police officers’ qualified immunity from lawsuits.  Last year Colorado and Connecticut passed laws ending police immunity, and states of New Mexico, Florida, and Maine are currently considering similar legislation. These efforts need to be expanded to all states and broadened to eliminate qualified immunity of police officers and absolute immunity of prosecutors. 

I personally experienced a 12 year legal nightmare that eventually resulted in the first prosecutor in Maine’s history to be disciplined through my bar complaint, and several police and prosecutors settling my Federal civil rights lawsuit against them.  It took years to fight through the maze of legal obstacles.  My final results were extremely rare as it is virtually impossible to overcome police and prosecutorial immunity in court.  

In Maine, state representative Jeffrey Evangelos introduced a new bill called An Act To Eliminate Qualified Immunity for Police Officers.  Some in law enforcement have voiced their opposition, arguing that it would impede their work unless they have immunity from lawsuits for misconduct.  It is a very cynical argument, suggesting that police can only do their job if they have immunity to violate people’s rights.  It is the same type of argument prosecutors make to defend their own absolute immunity.

Rather than help protect the efficacy and integrity of the justice system, qualified and absolute immunity allows state actors to engage in civil rights abuse with impunity.  I personally experienced police and prosecutors engage in egregious misconduct such as withholding crucial exculpatory evidence and fabricating false evidence and reports.  Police and prosecutors are almost never held accountable for their misconduct.  Even after all the unprecedented court findings in my case, no one even faced reprimand from their superiors, or from the attorney general. The actors in question were not even put on the Giglio list, which requires a record and disclosure to defense attorneys of any police officers with past credibility issues.

Often, prosecutors and police are not even held to legal and professional standards of conduct by officials who are responsible with their oversight.  Victims of misconduct are usually left with no recourse as most private attorneys will not undertake civil lawsuits against police or prosecutors because they are expensive and virtually impossible to win due to complex immunity protections involved.  And while many who are accused of crimes are only provided underpaid court appointed attorneys to defend them, police and prosecutors get exceptional private defense attorneys from reputable law firms to defend them at public’s expense.

In rare cases where police or prosecutors lose a civil lawsuit, the State or municipal insurance pays the judgement on their behalf.  Ending qualified and absolute immunity would force insurance companies and state and local governments to scrutinize police and prosecutors as a condition of insuring them.  Such forced scrutiny would help protect the public from abusive officials by preventing them from being insurable, hence make them un-hireable for positions of power.

The Federal Court’s Final Judgement in my lawsuit called my experience in Maine courts a living example of what Franz Kafka wrote about in his novel “The Trial”.  Similar Kafkaesque abuses will only continue so long as police and prosecutors are not held fully accountable for their misconduct.

The Founding Fathers fought the British crown in order to live free of its nobility’s privilege to abuse their power with full immunity.   It is un-American to continue a relic of that class system, derived directly from the British Common Law of king’s courts, which gave its law enforcers immunity for their misconduct.   We must all be equal under the law and be afforded the same protection of our inalienable Constitutional Rights.  Abolishing police and prosecutorial immunity would help protect people’s rights, and the integrity of the justice system.

© Vladek Filler

Maine’s Two Systems of Justice

Having seen many cases of women getting a pass for violent crimes against men, the details of a recent plea deal given to a female killer in Ellsworth, Maine dispels all illusions about equality and justice.

The case involved a woman named Savanah Lynn Smith who was charged with murdering her boyfriend’s 2 year old daughter, little Kloe Hawksley.

Former prosecutor Mary Kellett-Gray was the woman’s defense co-counsel and negotiated a plea deal with assistant attorney general Leanne Robbin.  The plea deal was accepted by judge Robert Murray.

It allowed Savannah Smith to avoid taking responsibility through a ‘no contest’ plea, also known as an Alford plea.  The sentence was to be “10 years” in prison. With credit for good behavior her attorney stated she will be free in 6 years, however with credit for her time in custody, Smith would likely be freed in just 5 years. 

The plea deal was given despite gruesome details and evidence in the case.

At sentencing, assistant attorney general Leanne Robbin stated that the child died from blunt force trauma to the torso; that “Kloe’s small intestine was severed from her stomach” and that “Kloe was a victim of repeated physical abuse.”

At the hearing, the child’s father, Tyler Hawksley said, “I cannot express enough the pain, anger, and frustration this has caused in these past few years.”

The child’s mother, Keeli Cousins, told the judge that “Every morning when I wake up I have to remind myself that in the end Kloe will no longer be abused. [We] will spend the rest of our lives trying to heal and I can only hope that somehow there is justice for Kloe”.

Defense attorney Mary Kellett advocated for the female killer, arguing that, “She is just 22 now […] she is definitely a probation candidate because of her youth but also her willingness to grow and learn and contribute to society.”

Savannah Smith addressed the court stating, “I’m sorry for the role I had in what happened. I can’t take back anything I did or didn’t do.”

Speaking to local media after the hearing, assistant attorney general Leanne Robbin said the killer “basically spared the family” from a trial and she will now have a chance to turn her life around.  “That’s what it’s all about” said AAG Robbin, “this is a game-changer for her, to accept responsibility for manslaughter.” 

Did Kloe’s parents feel “spared” from a criminal trial?  Do they believe 5 years in prison, no admission of responsibility, and helping the child killer turn her life around is what justice is “all about” in this case?

Kellett’s co-counsel, defense attorney Jeffrey Silverstein, told the media that “I know that the family had some misgivings, but these cases are always in the nature of compromise.”

At sentencing, judge Robert Murray stated, “Savannah Smith, you did recklessly cause the death of Kloe Hawksley”. 

Does that mean the investigation, the medical examiner’s report, and the murder charge were all just trumped up?  On one hand the prosecution presented medical examiner’s findings of Kloe’s repeated abuse and very violent cause of death.  On the other hand, they gave a plea deal and ignored their own evidence in order to call it a “recklessly caused” death by manslaughter.

Having followed many cases in Maine, such mental and legal gymnastics have only been performed for female perpetrators.  Whether it’s for murder, manslaughter, assault, or child molestation; female offenders in Maine routinely get outrageous plea deals, while men get punished by the system even for baseless accusations made by scorned ex-lovers.

Females in Maine also get special treatment by the media and domestic violence groups.  In little Kloe’s case, no one in the media dared call it a ‘domestic violence homicide’.   Nor did Maine domestic violence groups issue press releases, hold vigils, or voiced outrage about the plea deal.  Little Kloe’s family and friends were apparently left to fight for justice on their own.

Had Kloe’s killer been a man, the media would endlessly demonize him and create political outrage.  Domestic violence groups would hold vigils and issue press releases demanding even stricter new laws and even more funding for their organizations.

Maine’s progressively Orwellian domestic violence laws and “risk assessments” are apparently reserved only for men.  Savannah Smith had three young children of her own and was allowed to remain free for 1 ½ years before she was even arrested and charged with murdering little Kloe.

But this really is less about Savannah Smith and more about how such cases are handled.

The same justice system that pretends to give men a fair trial plays a different game of ‘pretend’ for female offenders.  Even when investigations of female crimes are actually conducted, the evidence often ends up being deemed as somehow insufficient for prosecution.  Female feelings, motives, and personal circumstances are given extraordinary weight to allow very special treatment using very different standards.  

In the case of little Kloe, the public was gaslighted to believe that the plea deal resulted in Smith taking full responsibility to be paid for with “10 years” in prison while “sparing the family from a trial”.  Even the prosecutor in the case was publicly advocating for this female as if she is the victim.  How many prosecutors publicly advocate for game changing plea deals to help male child killers turn their life around?

A system which abuses power for political and personal agendas is not a system that is concerned with truth or justice.  Like countless male victims in Maine, little Kloe Hawksley and her family are victims of Maine’s radical feminist justice system that has made female criminals a protected class.  

Those who have dealt with that corrupt and biased system, and its officers, understand that they are not concerned with truth or justice.

Nothing can illustrate it better than a judge, a prosecutor, and defense attorneys showing more concern for a female killer’s future than for a 2 year old child who she brutally killed.

© Vladek Filler

Are we living in a post truth and justice world?

My name is Vladek Filler.  In 2007 I was falsely accused by my then wife when I sought to end our marriage and gain custody of our children.  What followed were coached allegations, trumped up charges, prosecutions, false convictions, false imprisonment, appeals, my complete vindication, and a first of its kind Bar complaint and civil rights lawsuit.

I have appeared before Maine’s District Court, Superior Court, Supreme Court, Federal U.S. District Court, and the U.S. 1st Circuit Court of Appeals.  At last count, some 22 judges were involved in this living nightmare which spanned 12 years.   My case has been the subject of national media reports, legal case studies, and legislative discussions.

When my ordeal began, I was faced with a different reality where evidence of the truth did not matter to those pursuing the prosecution; nor did it matter to those responsible with oversight.  I experienced officials ignoring the truth, violating laws and court orders, withholding and destroying exculpatory evidence, fabricating evidence, and openly lying to the court and jury with impunity. 

The Federal District Court in its 2019 final judgment equated my “horrendous experience with the criminal justice system in Maine to [the novel] THE TRIAL by Franz Kafka.

Despite court findings and my complaints to the attorney general, not a single Maine official was even fired for engaging in egregious misconduct in my case.

Repeatedly I urged State and Federal officials to fulfill their most basic oversight obligations.  But no amount of court findings or evidence of crimes ever resulted in law enforcement officials initiating any action or investigation–let alone treat a protected class of offenders the same way innocent people were being destroyed for mere baseless accusations.

My horrendous experience was not unique.   I was one of many men who was falsely accused and maliciously prosecuted in Maine courts.  Countless lives were ruined.

Having fought 12 years of battles on numerous legal fronts in my case, it is my opinion that for average Americans the reality today is only getting worse.  More people are finding themselves faced with a system that acts indifferently to truth and justice.  State and Federal officials are often ignoring basic Constitutional Rights for their own personal and political agendas.  It is clear the system is not going to hold itself to its own standards. 

For the sake of this nation, people must fight by all means necessary to hold all government officials accountable for misconduct.

© Vladek Filler